Tag Archives: NYC

Meet & Greet – Michelle

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Meet & Greet Michelle

Michelle Edgemont is a Brooklyn based wedding designer who specializes in custom crafted decorations, flowers, and styling for couples looking to throw conventionality out the window – and bring their own whimsical, warm, sparkling personalities into their wedding day. Her style is bright, sunshine bright, rainbow laden, a little bit sixties and with a lot of modern quirkiness. She is extremely approachable, a cross between your favorite kindergarten teacher and your scrap-booking best friend.

Michelle Edgemont / The Walkup

Michelle offers a wide range of services. She can style, decorate and make you a rustic boutonniere all in an afternoon. She’ll embroider you a ring bearer’s pillow while setting a dreamlike tablescape; she will defy gravity by hanging bunches of stemmed carnations upside down! Her clients hire her to create custom crafted elements and funky floral arrangements that scream their own unique sense of awesome.

Let’s get to know her through The Walkup’s EAT / SEE / DO / SHOP series! 

Name: Michelle Edgemont
Location: Clinton Hill, Brooklyn
Job: Wedding Designer and Florist
Age: 30

Michelle Edgemont Detail

I used to be of the thought that “glitter was the herpes of the craft world” but lately my stance has changed. I am now all for a little strategically placed sparkle on nails or down the aisle!

Eat: Ample Hills Creamery / Ice Cream. I have a definite sweet tooth and this ice cream shoppe in Prospect Heights is my go-to place for a few scoops. They make everything in house and have some interesting and creative flavors. My favorite is Peppermint Patty, although the Salted Caramel Crack is what got them famous. I also highly recommend a root beer float or a giant sundae covered in hot fudge sauce.
Michelle Edgemont / Ample Hills / The Walkup
See: The view out of my sixth floor living room windows. I’m lucky to live in Brooklyn and not have super tall buildings blocking my view. I can see all the way to Long Island on a good day. It’s not the Manhattan skyline, but it brings in a good amount of light and the sunrise.
The Lower Manhattan Skyline from Brooklyn
The Lower Manhattan Skyline from Brooklyn Heights. This is how I imagine Michelle sees her world – covered in confetti! 

Michelle Edgemont Detail

The importance of photographs is closely tied to the importance of memory. Creating pictures is akin to remembering great nights and moments! Snap a polaroid and hang it by a clothespin. Put vintage images in menu holders! Spread the cheer by showing off the most important people in your life. 

Michelle Edgemont Detail

Geometric modernism meets Great Gatsby detailing! The devil, and the time period, is indeed in the details. 

Shop: Local stores in my neighborhood. There is not better way to support a community than to contribute to the local restaurants and shops that are small businesses.
Do: When I’m not consumed with my wedding clients, my favorite thing to do is spend time at the beach on a hot summer day. Counting down the days to when I can do that again! Summer, please come soon!

Michelle Edgemont Detail

Garland, string lights, fresh flowers, handmade cocktails and pops of color. Michelle can do no wrong (are you spotting her expertise in textile design? She earned a degree from Fashion Institute of Technology)! 

If you love flowers, stars, rainbows, unicorns, geometric shapes and optimism, visit Michelle’s blog for her beautiful images. Live colorfully!

Fort Greene

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I am having a love affair with Brownstones. This isn’t the first time inanimate objects have caught my eye.  The building materials used in such homes are a brown Triassic or Jurassic era sandstone which was once an extremely popular building material. The term. “brownstone”, is also used on the East Coast (particularly Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Delaware and Maryland) of the United States to refer to a terraced house or rowhouse clad in this material. The stone is extremely durable, it also carries with it years of history and the connotations of another, quainter time period.

Fort Green Brownstone

DSC_0727

An office filing cabinet plays double duty as an entry table.
Fort Green Brownstone

Natural light in spades.
Fort Green Brownstone
Fort Green Brownstone

Fort Green Brownstone

Fort Green Brownstone

The low, stainless steel industrial table allows the space to feel historic yet contemporary. The mantlepiece is filled with vases ala Italian artist Morandi.

Fort Green Brownstone

Tonight’s cultural activeities in the salon include a rendition of the Metropolitan Opera’s version of Elektra, Op. 58, a one-act opera by Richard Strauss.

Fort Green Brownstone

According to color theory, an alizarin crimson red room gives the room sophistication and warmth. Red raises a room’s energy level. It’s affect is usually stimulating – raising heart rate or stimulating conversation. Fort Green Brownstone

As the esteemed author, poet, philosopher and muse, Jorge Luis Borges, once quipped, “I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library.”

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The Armory Show

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Every March, like the migration of strange Monarch butterflies, artists, galleries, collectors, critics and curators from across the globe make New York their destination during Armory Arts Week. From March 7-10, 2013, stationed at the Chelsea Piers 92 & 94 overlooking the Hudson, a hangar’s worth of creativity bustles in the largest NYC art fair. The fair has changed locations since its inaugural 1913 debut – from the East Side to Chicago to the Cincinnati Art Museum to Amherst College – ultimately that its coming back to its roots. The piers at the Armory Show, now designated as Contemporary and Modern, are devoted to showcasing the most important, notorious, and emerging artworks of the 20th and 21st centuries.
Erica and Max

My friends Max and Erica enjoy a Pain au chocolat, muffin, Diet Coke and Coffee in the VIP Lounge fitted by Roche Bobois.

The Armory Show 2013The Armory Show 2013

The Hudson River on the West Side of the island was once central to to the city’s trade and transportation infrastructure. With the success of the auto industry, American’s reliance on waterways diminished and all-but-halted. Businesses at the piers closed down and many structures were left to decay. The desolate, vacuous spaces could be dangerous territory but also offered temporary homes to various artist projects, the most illustrious, perhaps, being Gordon Matta-Clark’s iconic Day’s End on Pier 52 in 1974.

The Armory Show 2013

The Armory Show 2013

The Armory Show 2013

Samsøn Projects of Boston had a booth arrayed with bongs, Carl Sagan and retail price tag fastener, featuring the works of Todd Pavlisko. 

The Armory Show 2013

The Armory Show 2013

Peter Liversidge, Ingelby Gallery London.

Peter Liversidge’s presented by Ingelby Gallery, London. Etc, 2011, neon.  Remember the seen from The King and I? Etcetera, Etcetera, Etcetera!

The Armory Show 2013
The Armory Show 2013 Destined to be a new Penguin ClassicLove Kicked Me Down (Where I Belong) by Harland Miller. 

The Armory Show 2013

The “Day’s End” Champagne Bar at the Armory Show Contemporary section. Little did you know that this Pommery Champagne bar is steeped in art history. The special light-bulb sculpture Day’s End, 2013, is site-specific installation by Peter Liversidge that references an eponymous work by Gordon Matta-Clarke on pier 52 from 1974-75; and Marcel Duchamp & Ulf Linde – Posterity Will Have a Word to Say, a special tribute to the 100th anniversary of the 1913 Armory Show, curated by Jan Åman. Drink up.

Cary Leibowitz Cary Leibowitz Cary Leibowitz

Cary Leibowitz’s  installation from Invisible Exports was a little too on-the-nose with its pessimistic yet honest take on pie charts, cliches and children’s rhymes.

Kevin-Harman_ForeverKevin Harman, Forever, 2012, mirror, carved oak frames, padlock 137 x 88 x 26 cm. INGLEBY GALLERY.

James-Hugonin-Binary-Rhythm-III-2011James Hugging, Binary Rhythm (III), 2012, oil and wax on wood, 189.5 x 169 cm.  INGLEBY GALLERY.

The Armory Show 2013

Brian Calvin, Can With A Landscape (Robin), 2009.  The otherworldly, martian quality of the artist’s portraits is ominous. Alex Katz’s influence on Calvin seems obviously delightful.

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