Category Archives: pastel

It’s the economy, stupid.

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Candy nostalgia reigns supreme in the Lower East Side’s Economy Candy store. This circa-1937 Lower East Side staple is filled from floor to ceiling with retro and international confections, including innumerable  brands you never knew were still in production, or even existed from the get-go. Remember wanting to ‘smoke’ candy cigarettes at the corner drugstore like the big kids? Want a piece of Big League Chew after Sunday’s pick-up game? Imagine a rainbow colored array of chocolates, candy button, lollipops, taffies, collectible Pez dispensers, rock candies, gum-balls and every treat that’s meant to upset your dentist. New York Magazine’s review writes, “Rivington Street’s Economy Candy is pure over-the-top New York, a font of variety and abundance that would leave Willy Wonka weeping in his cocoa.”

That’s me, Keren, posing like Economy Candy’s mascot, below! See the resemblance?

Want an Economy Candy Tote for your finds?

Candies by the box

Zagnut bar? Here. Charleston Chews? You bet baby! You want thingamabobs? They’ve got twenty…It is literally impossible to feel depressed in this sucrose, dextrose neon colored dream. In usual NYC fashion, the store is three times smaller than it should be, almost like a Hoarders episode meets an encyclopedic, library-esque sweets store. The space can feel cramped pretty quickly, and lines of by-the-pound shoppers can get daunting during (sugar) rush hour but, don’t let that dismay you!

Baseball Cards and Candy Buttons

Kitsch Galore with Piggy Bank Tins

Fox’s U-bet Chocolate & Flavored Syrups are an original, Brooklyn-bred treat from the era of the soda jerk! Created in 1895, this liquid is rumored to be the only way to make a perfect New York Chocolate Egg Cream.

I will let Economy Candy explain the history of this institution, straight from the horse’s mouth, “Since 1937, on the Lower East Side Economy Candy is an old-fashioned, family-owned candy store that sells hundreds of kinds of chocolates, candies, nuts, dried fruits; including halvah, sugar free candy and of course all the old time candy you had when you were a kid.

When Jerry Cohen’s father opened Economy Candy in 1937, it was a typical corner candy store of its day. Bulk bins full of colorful hard candies enticed youngsters with their panorama of choices. Guys could buy their dolls a heart-shaped box of chocolates when they had trouble expressing themselves in words. Barrels in the back yielded a geography lesson of nuts from around the world. The hard times of the Depression were easing up, the grim specter of war-to-come wasn’t yet hovering over American shores, and television was a scientific marvel that was unlikely to have any practical commercial application.

Years later, the Dow Jones is soaring to previously unimagined heights, military actions are measured in days, and computer-literate three-year-olds are unnervingly common. And the former youngsters of 1937 still visit Economy Candy for a scoop of goodies, a bag of pistachios, or a slice of halvah like you can’t get anywhere else. And their children and their children’s children shop there, too. This old-fashioned candy store offers SOLID DISCOUNTS on everything from sour balls to upscale chocolates.”

Lollipop, Lollipop, Oh Lolly Lolly Pop!

My coffee cup is resting precariously on Old Fashioned Candy Sticks and Candy Canes so I could get this shot of the M&M wall. The confectionary utopia has common candies as well (and sometimes ever color coded), however its strength lies in the products of yore!  The whole space reads like a Pop Art painting.

My friend, Jeffrey J., exploring the endless possibilities in this parlor of sweets.

The Candy Man Can

Feel like a “Kid in a candy store”, yet? If buying in bulk is not your forte, trying living with these pastel, saccharine soaked products:

Candy is Dandy but Liquor is Quicker

Shop by the Numbers:  1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8

Let Them Eat Cake

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The word “pastel” as we know it is originally an art term (of course). It technically is the term for a powdered pigment stick (or chalks) in a binder. The most widely used form of pastels is a “soft pastel” which is a crayon that can be easily smudged and whose colors are bright. Pastel techniques can be challenging since the medium is mixed and blended directly on the working surface, and unlike in paints, colors cannot be tested on a palette before applying to the media. The pastel form was first mentioned by Leonardo da Vinci (who apparently invented and discovered EVERYTHING) in 1495. Because the use of pastel and term has become so colloquial and ubiquitous – IT HAS BECOME AN ADJECTIVE – pastels can now mean any color that is pale in color and saturated in a low hue. Let us hop into the candy-colored, cake-frosted world of pastels (encompassing several art forms):

Wayne Thiebaud “Cakes and a Counter,” 1963, National Gallery of Art

THE ABOVE IMAGE IS A PHOTOGRAPH AND REPLICA OF THE THIEBAUD PAINTING. The Inspiration: “Cakes,” by American artist Wayne Thiebaud, 1963. Williams Freeman’s sugary spread is virtually identical to the original. Image found via Martha Stewart Weddings, HERE.

 Wayne Thiebaud Pies, Pies, Pies 1961. Oil on canvas 20 x 30 in (50.8 x 76.2 cm) Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento.

Mary Cassatt, Sleepy Baby, 1910

Ian Davenport,”Puddle Painting: White”, 2008

Ian Davenport, Prismatic Diptych (Ghost), 2011, Colour etching diptych on Hahnemühle Bright White 300 gsm paper

I find these muted hues extremely calming, almost bordering on earth tones (on that note, it is said that technically cave paintings could be considered pastels). My bedroom is in a pastel, sage green so that I can feel relaxed before the sandman visits. A pastel color palette feels cozy and inviting. It also allows your home to be in a perennial spring!

Why not live inside of an Easter Egg Shell? Image found HERE.

I am showing this even though I am not the biggest fan of slipcovers. To each his own pastel! Image found at InteriorHolic, HERE.

Image found at House To Home, HERE.

Photographer Deborah Whitalw Llewellyn found via Coastal Living, HERE.

Add a little touch of Versailles to your life! Image found at the Shelterness, HERE.

A dessert colored palette readymade in your kitchen. Who wouldn’t want to be a baker living in this? Image found HERE.

The colors and the glass jars transport me to 1920’s Italy. This image hails form a GELATO THEMED BRIDAL SHOWER found at Ruffled, HERE.

Pastel living room found HERE.

I get that this isn’t TECHNICALLY interior design, but I actually could not resist. Photo by Camilla Lindqvist.

Image designed by Behr Paints, exact colors and image details found HERE.

Image found HERE.

Pastel meets crochet meets Art Deco, found HERE.

NOW HOW CAN YOU LIVE IN A VAT OF FROSTING?

Shop by the Numbers: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 /

Pistachio (or, Crack that Nut)

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When I worked at Friendly’s Olde Ice Cream Shoppe as a teenager the store had two specials for retired individuals or members of the AARP. In the mornings, they could get breakfast for nary $2.99 including unlimited coffee, two eggs, and a side. In the evenings before 6:00 pm, as part of the Early Bird Special, the customers could choose from a list of entrees that came with a one scoop sundae. Invariably, the customers ALWAYS ordered pistachio ice cream. Once a person turns a certain age, clearly, this flavor will definitely become ones favorite. I must have served over 2,000 scoops of this green treat.

Image Via Oh Joy! And what a joy it is!

Image via Cook Your Dream.

Image via The Girl Who Ate Everything. Why not use this cranberry-pistachio cookie to inspire your next room palette?

For the longest time this bold yet subdued green reminded me of granny squares and a retirement home in Miami – YET – it’s official, it’s cool again, it’s actually even, dare I say, YOUNG!

According to the article, The History and Agriculture of the Pistachio Nut, “Archaeologists have found evidence from excavations at Jarmo in northeastern Iraq that pistachio nuts were a common food as early as 6750 BCE.

It is even rumored that the pistachio nuts were creeping down the walls of the great wonder, The Hanging Garden of Babylon.

Jason Oliver Nixon & John Loecke via Domino Magazine (RIP), October 2008.

The Pistachio Tree meets the Mint Herb in this fifties, retro inspired kitchen (Here).

I know this monochromatic wonder is a LOT, but I feel as though I am sitting in a field of verdant grasses! Via Bright Bazaar and the U.K. based Ideal Home magazine.

Jonathan Adler always hits the nail on the head with modern design mixed with traditional and antique finds. Hello white lacquer table.

Wallpaper via Fern Living, image by Betsy Maddox.

Domino Magazine strikes again!

Image via Live Like You.

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