Category Archives: modern

Mixology (28)

Posted on

The Walkup

Room: I have been majorly smitten with this  Zebra print wallpaper ever since Wes Anderson introduced me to it in the Royal Tenenbaums. Years later, I still cannot get over the Scalamandre design.  The eclectic, vermillion, safari-inspired foyer was created by Rikki Snyder. 

Artwork: Zebra Bandits by Andrea Wan by the Working Proof. This piece was originally illustrated to accompany a short children’s story published in Nido, a German parenting magazine. The story is about a small lurch who saved the smell of the circus from a group of Zebra bandits. The giclee print also serves a humanitarian purpose – 15% of  of the gross sale of this print goes to: Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders.

The Walkup

Room: Designer Elizabeth Dinkel’s choice of twin beds for Her Guest Room have a mystical yet feminine quality.  The room’s teal design veers towards a fashion-forward approach – with detailed tailoring and velvet textures punched up with exotic Moroccan trappings. The colors are seaside, but the style is exotic. Room found at The Great House at Greystone Estate, an unoccupied mansion which recently blossomed under the care of some of the most distinguished interior and landscape designers in the industry via Veranda.

Artwork:  Artist Mario “nerosunero” Sughi explores biking’s introspective powers in this archival, bamboo print titled, Escape/Blue Landscape via UGallery. Mario explains  that he sees his chic biker in the midst of “crossing an abstract landscape both physically and mentally.” She moves from chore to chore with shopping bags in tow and a mind buzzing with activity.

I thought of that while riding my bicycle. — Albert Einstein (on the Theory of Relativity)

The Walkup

Room: Leather edges and a lift-out tray let the Tray Chic Ottoman multitask as table, bench, and footstool. The Nailhead Sofa is in solid velvet, so patterned throws and pillows can easily change its look. All textiles by BeeLine Home. Curtains made of Indian bedspreads frame an urn from John Rosselli Antiques & Decorations. The room is verdant, lit and very 1970’s in its color palette. Avocado mixes nicely with caramel brown and orange peel. Image by Thomas Loof, via House Beautiful.

Artwork: A reproduction of Jules Olitski’s Purple Golubchik from1962 via Artriver. Olitski was an American abstract painter, printmaker, and sculptor. His modern art is known for its brilliant colors, dynamic movement, unexpected harmonies and chromatic shifts. The print almost seems to be moving, tumbling, spinning.

THE BEST PART of modeling an entire room after the aforementioned artworks? They are all affordable prints at under $100 each! 

Meet & Greet – Annabelle

Posted on

Meet Annabelle of the decor website Stylish Furniture & Decor. Annabelle worked for 10 years as a residential Interior Designer in Washington, DC and New York City, NY. She was inspired to start her new online furniture business because of her love of sourcing and helping to supervise a client’s design process. She believes that a new purchase as simple as one chair can help a home to feel “completely furnished”. She explains, “There is no purchase or project too small – as every piece is an important component.” She describes her website’s offerings as “sleek, “trendy”, and “fashionable”. Her favorite decorative time period is the present (even though I would love to live in Versailles or the Greco-Roman Era, her answer makes much more sense…I do love indoor plumbing)! She explains that, her version of “modern design” means mixing pieces from different periods and having fun with unexpected design.

Annabelle is a fellow New Yorker who lives in the West Village (one of my personal favorite neighborhoods in the city). As part of the EAT/SEE/SHOP/DO series, I asked her to come up with a short list of her favorites –

EAT: Mole, a Mexican restaurant on 57 Jane St, at the corner of Hudson St. New York, NY 10014. The mole enchiladas are actually to die for.

Image courtesy of Mole, West Village, HERE.

SEE: The Hudson River Park is one her favorite things about living in the West Village, she adores being able to access the river walk. The area is the largest park to be built in Manhattan since the completion of Central Park. It is right along the water and boasts amazing skylines and sunsets. The park also includes tennis courts and skateparks!

Image found HERE.

SHOP: Chelsea Market, especially the produce market, The Lobster Place (fresh lobster, fishmongers, and shellfish on ice!), and Buon Italia. If you plan on picking up ingredients for a gourmet dinner, this is your one-stop shop.

Image courtesy of Wikipedia Commons.

DO: Sunday afternoon cocktails at any restaurant in the West Village or Chelsea! It’s always lively and fun! Bonus points for finding seats outside on a nice day for people watching.

Although Annabelle describes her home as simple and tailored meets cozy bachelor pad (her husband’s stuff), her website has a decidedly art deco, midcentury, anthropomorphic, and retro vibe. Here are my favorite finds from her site:

Shop by the Numbers: : 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8

If you love these items, Annabelle has agreed to give The Walkup readers a whopping 10% off all items from today until 5/31/2012, with the code WALKUP. Enjoy perusing!

Read the rest of this entry

Lucite in the Sky with Diamonds

Posted on

This just in – Lucite is not longer for stripper heels or for your lewd cousin Sally. Although I always associated the material with wanton fantasies and ladies of the night, its style resurgence has begun!

The material can be used to preserve items in a resin like substance – it also has a bevy of other uses including in CDs, tattoo ink, ceramics, rocket fuel, fiber optics, dental fillings, aquarium windows, hockey rinks, jewelry, cosmetic surgery, and basically everywhere one looks. Perspex, a type of lucite, has been used as a surface to paint on (rather than traditional canvas) by Salvador Dali.

Is it a table? A book? A Painting? Salvador Dali, Freud, Moise et le monothéisme, 1974  The texts chosen above were actually based in alchemy. 

Hailed as a chemical wonder and used in World War II bombers. Lucite was able to be explored in more domestic settings after the war. Here is an illustration from Modern Materials for Modern Living: Bakelite Plastics, 1957. I am assuming the windows are plexiglass. Image found HERE.

Simply put, lucite is a shatter resistant, acrylic alternative to glass. The material was developed in 1928 in various laboratories, and was first brought to market in 1933 by Rohm and Haas Company, under the trademark Plexiglas. It has since been sold under many different names including Lucite and Perspex. I was going to attempt to give you the full and official name but all the “poly”, “methyl”, “acrylate”, “methylpropenoate”, and other chemically words had be a bit tongue tied.

 

A simple and clean solution to a watch display. Image found via The Glitter Guide, HERE.

Lucite backed bar stools and  the notable Oly Studio lighting. 

The translucent material camouflages itself to match any decorating scheme. Image via DecorPad. 

I spy Domino Magazine! That coffee table allows the magazines to look as though they are in a shadowbox on display. The lucite screen divider separates a room without shrinking its size. Image screen cap found via Lonny Magazine.

Image found HERE.

Contemporary gray foyer entry design with lucite acrylic console table, tall slat back chair, owl umbrella stand, white & black abstract art, white branch candle holders, gray walls paint color, crown moulding and crystal chandelier by Lori Graham. Image found HERE. 

A pop of color is calmed down by the clarity of lucite! Image by Tara Seawright, found HERE.

Cinderella would have made an entrance down this staircase whether or not she was wearing her glass (or lucite) slipper. The bannister is designed by Thomas Britt. Hanging on the stairs is Walking Cake II by Laurie Simmons. Photos by Andi Hatch and Francois Halard. Image found HERE. 

I would not mind reading, writing, or working at this wonder of a desk. Image via Atlanta Homes Magazine.

HOW DO I LIVE IN A CHEMICALLY MADE CLEAR RESIN LIFE?

Shop by the Numbers: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8

 

%d bloggers like this: