Category Archives: interior design

Copycat // Jenna Lyons

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Jenna Lyons, J. Crew president and creative director, and all around well-dressed woman, sold her Park Slope, Brooklyn town-home in 2012. She moved back into Manhattan, into the downtown, abandoned-factory rich area of Tribeca. Prior to selling, we voyeuristically got a peek inside the trendsetter’s digs, thanks to Sotheby’s. In a wondrous tight-rope act, the space is modern yet antique, glamourous yet minimal.

Step inside, and learn to recreate this renovated 1880’s Brownstone.

J. Crew Meets a Park Slope Brownstone

Jenna Lyons Brownstone Items

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Where woodsy, lumberjack and animal-fur viking decor meet elegant, ballroom chandeliers and gilded mirrors.

J. Crew Meets a Park Slope Brownstone

J. Crew Meets a Park Slope Brownstone

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Where polka-dots dance upon high contrast black and white accents, wire rimmed chairs, wood pallets and glossy floors. 

J. Crew Meets a Park Slope Brownstone

J. Crew Meets a Park Slope Brownstone

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This closet has a limestone mantle. Yes, I am jealous of the myriad shoes, but a fireplace in a closet puts me over the edge! 

David Weeks Studio

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David Weeks Studio / The Walkup

David Weeks is an American designer known for lighting, furniture, and household products. He has created capsule collections for Areaware, Kikkerland and Ralph Pucci International. His unique, geometric, modular and cone shaped chandeliers can be found in such famous places as Kate Spade boutiques, Barney’s New York, The Juilliard School, Saks Fifth Avenue, The MGM Grand Las Vegas  and in the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Weeks is the recipient of several design awards, a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, and a proud Brooklynite.

You have probably passed a David Weeks lighting fixture, desk lamp or lounge chair over a dozen times without even realizing it. His designs are unobtrusive and functional yet, upon further glance extremely delicate and whimsical.

Boerum Hill, Brooklyn

A custom David Weeks Torroja chandelier with black Bottle shades hangs in the dining area of a Boerum Hill, Brooklyn townhouse. Featured in Dwell magazine, February 2013 via David Weeks Studio Blog.

Loft Space

High ceilings and an open concept loft space on Fifth Avenue allow this office space with a large marble-top table modern, yet inviting. The chairs are by Paul McCobb and the hanging chandelier is by David Weeks, available at Ralph Pucci). The rug was made in Turkey from Angora-goat hair and seems ready for toes to sink into. Courtesy of Madeline Weinrib via New York Magazine.

West Village Townhouse, Renovation

In Julianne Moore’s remodeled, West Village brownstone, a floor lamp by Brooklyn designer David Weeks illuminates a corner of the wood-centric dining area via Remodelista. The wood-beamed ceiling and high archways only add to this rustic, city meets country vibe.

High Ceilings

In the dining and living areas of a duplex loft, chandeliers by Lindsey Adelman and David Weeks accent the art collection, which includes pieces by Keith Haring, Damien Hirst, and Andy Warhol. Images of the airy Manhattan loft, with enviable views, via Interior Design.

Suite NY Dining Room

Hans Wegner’s CH20 Chair is line the table in the formal dining room of an upper east side apartment.  A David Weeks light draws the eye in several diagonals and lights the space in a clever fashion. Interiors by Tori Golub Interior Design. Photography by Aaron Fedor via Suite NY.

High Ceilings

Raw wood, bare, black metal lines are accentuated by a deep purple couch, and mobile-esque presentation of the Weeks chandelier. Image found at Daily Dream Decor via Aubrey Road.

Aspen House

Soft cream details, dark and glossy wood floors, an animal skin rug, a David Weeks fixture and bare timber ceiling beams combine to make this the perfect Aspen Mountain Retreat by Emily Summers Design Associates.

Elaine McHale, Home & Interiors

A very spartan home uses a David Weeks lighting design for its visual interest found via home & interiors.

Lost City Arts Chaise Lounge, Francesca Connolly's Brooklyn BrownstoneCo-founder of Remodelista, Francesca Connolly’s, Brooklyn Heights brownstone. The owner explains “I have this chaise in my bedroom covered in pale blue velvet. It’s a reproduction that Lost City Arts makes. Perfectly proportioned; lean and sleek, and surprisingly comfortable. A great spot for kids that have wondered in in the middle of the night.” See more of Francesca’s sophisticated home, featured in a past issue of Elle Decor.

Provide Home

Bedside table by Christian Woo, art work by Joshua Van Dyke, lamp by David Weeks Studio (looking strangely like an alien lifeform) via Provide Home‘s Flickr.

David Weeks Studio / The Walkup

I am undecided whether the chandelier or the view is the best part. Both are pretty spectacular.

David Weeks Studio / The WalkupA happy, mod and sixties vibe: oranges, yellows, creams and high gloss accents make this oblong living space. Do you pick up the candy or the coffee-table book first?

Boi Sconce

A David Weeks Studio Boi Sconce graces a room by Magdalena Keck Interior Design, NY. Photographed by Jeff Cate.

Weak at the knees for Weeks! 

Mixology (28)

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The Walkup

Room: I have been majorly smitten with this  Zebra print wallpaper ever since Wes Anderson introduced me to it in the Royal Tenenbaums. Years later, I still cannot get over the Scalamandre design.  The eclectic, vermillion, safari-inspired foyer was created by Rikki Snyder. 

Artwork: Zebra Bandits by Andrea Wan by the Working Proof. This piece was originally illustrated to accompany a short children’s story published in Nido, a German parenting magazine. The story is about a small lurch who saved the smell of the circus from a group of Zebra bandits. The giclee print also serves a humanitarian purpose – 15% of  of the gross sale of this print goes to: Médecins Sans Frontières / Doctors Without Borders.

The Walkup

Room: Designer Elizabeth Dinkel’s choice of twin beds for Her Guest Room have a mystical yet feminine quality.  The room’s teal design veers towards a fashion-forward approach – with detailed tailoring and velvet textures punched up with exotic Moroccan trappings. The colors are seaside, but the style is exotic. Room found at The Great House at Greystone Estate, an unoccupied mansion which recently blossomed under the care of some of the most distinguished interior and landscape designers in the industry via Veranda.

Artwork:  Artist Mario “nerosunero” Sughi explores biking’s introspective powers in this archival, bamboo print titled, Escape/Blue Landscape via UGallery. Mario explains  that he sees his chic biker in the midst of “crossing an abstract landscape both physically and mentally.” She moves from chore to chore with shopping bags in tow and a mind buzzing with activity.

I thought of that while riding my bicycle. — Albert Einstein (on the Theory of Relativity)

The Walkup

Room: Leather edges and a lift-out tray let the Tray Chic Ottoman multitask as table, bench, and footstool. The Nailhead Sofa is in solid velvet, so patterned throws and pillows can easily change its look. All textiles by BeeLine Home. Curtains made of Indian bedspreads frame an urn from John Rosselli Antiques & Decorations. The room is verdant, lit and very 1970’s in its color palette. Avocado mixes nicely with caramel brown and orange peel. Image by Thomas Loof, via House Beautiful.

Artwork: A reproduction of Jules Olitski’s Purple Golubchik from1962 via Artriver. Olitski was an American abstract painter, printmaker, and sculptor. His modern art is known for its brilliant colors, dynamic movement, unexpected harmonies and chromatic shifts. The print almost seems to be moving, tumbling, spinning.

THE BEST PART of modeling an entire room after the aforementioned artworks? They are all affordable prints at under $100 each! 

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